Collection

Ben Uri Strategy

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Ben Uri Collection

The most comprehensive and important collection of works by late 19th, 20th and 21st Century immigrant artists in the United Kingdom and the international museum sector. 

 
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Josef Herman | Refugees
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Frank Auerbach | Head of Helen Gillespie

We hold Europe’s only collection principally dedicated to emigre artists whether refugees or immigrants by choice or as more often as a result of terror. This unique collection comprises of over 1300 works by over 400 artists from 40 countries of birth.

You can search and view the Collection online by artist surname, or country of origin,  or decade of birth or death, or by male, female or emigre artists - the choice is yours.

The collection includes master works by our founder Lazar Berson; the famous including Frank Auerbach, David Bomberg, Marc Chagall, Sonia Delaunay, Jacob Epstein, Mark Gertler, George Grosz, Josef Herman, Leon Kossoff, Max Liebermann, Chaim Soutine, Alfred Wolmark; and the only now re-emerging reputations of those artists who fell into relative obscurity as a result of their forced journeys to escape tyranny or worse including Martin Bloch, Jacob Bornfriend, Dodo Burgner, Hugo Dachinger, Hans Feibusch, Eva Frankfurther, Alfred Lomnitz, Willi Rondas and Max Sokol - and some 370 more.

To view and or search for artists and works in our collection please visit www.benuricollection.org.uk

Art, Identity and Migration

Today the phrase ‘émigré artist’ may have a different meaning, because so many of us choose to live in other countries for pleasure, work and study, but there remains the same challenge of integration, of settling in a foreign land.

It is this study of art, migration and identity that lies at the heart of Ben Uri’s work. We continue to explore the artistic transition of artists today as we have for over a century, and since 2001 irrespective of nationality and religion.

The work and influence of immigrant artists are as important today as it was a century ago when the Jewish emigres including the Whitechapel Boys and often overlooked the Whitechapel Girls made their mark on British Modernism. The first home to so many of the immigrants then was Whitechapel and the East End of London where Ben Uri was founded in 1915 and little has changed since as so many new communities find a home, albeit cramped and impoverished, in the same areas.

Where to see the collection

Ben Uri has actively searched for a new Centrally located new home of appropriate size since re-opening in 2002 but finding an affordable site which is in the right location is, when budgets are tight and the money has to be raised, an immense task. Buy the wrong location and the institution is forced into a slow but sure terminal condition as sustainability is impossible within a city as competitive and vibrant as London. For the past few years we have sought a collecting, exhibiting and academic partnership with a synergistic university to maximise and enhance the Ben Uri museum strengths. 

Until then, we can only exhibit a small proportion of the collection in our temporary exhibition space in north London. You may also see works from the collection in one of Ben Uri’s many touring exhibitions. You can find out more in Exhibitions.